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Meet the artists behind the Walls Project murals

You’ve seen our walls, but how much do you know about the artists behind them? The creatives behind Walls Project murals and public art installations are just as important as the finished product. From painters and NFTs creators to animators and graphic artists, there’s wall space for everyone.


As we celebrate our 10-year anniversary, we checked in on some of the artists we’ve worked with in the past to hear about their experiences and vision for the future of our organization. Here’s what they had to say.


Wall #111 on Winbourne by Bryson Boutte

Bryson Boutte

1. What mural did you work on for the Walls Project?


2. Why was that piece important to you?

Mainly the ones done for MLK day were the ones that hit home. I was able to see the community and the dedicated people come out to impact a community. Not to mention the insane amount of coordination from the Walls Project. Always impressive.


3. Why do you think public art is so important for the city of Baton Rouge?

Public art directly impacts a community and its attitude towards itself. It’s seen as an investment in the beautification of the neighborhood while being able to tell a story.


4. What is your favorite memory about the mural or mural painting process?

Random people coming and telling stories while I paint.


Wall #125: "Drawing the line" by Bryson Boutte

5. What do you want to see for the future of the public art program?

More funding, more walls, and installations! Temporary installations would be fire.

 

Osage Fire Station Beautification by Morgan Tanner, Kelly Jackson and volunteers


Morgan Tanner

1. What mural did you work on for the Walls Project?


2. Why was that piece important to you?

The space will be revitalized to be a fun and enriching after-school space for kids. It’s so great to create inspirational art in a space that will be meaningful to so many kids!


3. Why do you think public art is so important for the city of Baton Rouge?

Contrary to popular belief, art is a necessity, not a luxury. Art allows us to see the world in different ways, to transform our minds and our hearts. It gives us something to rally around, something to enjoy together. Public art in Baton Rouge opens doors for us to showcase our lively culture and share important messages while connecting in the community.


4. What is your favorite memory about the mural or mural painting process?

I’ll never forget seeing how quickly the overall design came together with the help of our amazing volunteers. My personal favorite stage of creating a mural is always the last coat. I add shading and details that bring the design to life.


5. What do you want to see for the future of the public art program?

Adding more color and beauty in our world is always a lively thing. I’m a bit partial to big and bold works. It would be so fun to execute larger-scale projects with multiple supporting artists.

 

Wall #70 by Bryson Boutte, Ghost and Honeysuckle Moon


Antoine ‘Ghost’ Mitchell

1. What mural did you work on for the Walls Project?

The mural I worked on for The Walls Project was on the side of Brother's Meat Market (formally the classic Ann's Movie Theatre) in Scotlandville, LA for 2019 (or was it 2020?) Martin Luthor King Day of Service. Another artist and I created large paintings of classic Blaxploitation Film Posters. I was given Coffee and Cleopatra Jones. You can see them probably from the Airline Hwy overpass coming from or driving to the old Mississippi River bridge.


2. Why was that piece important to you?

Although those two ideas were chosen for me, I connected with them on many different fronts. First of all, I LOVE Black women and to paint these two influential characters portrayed by two PHENOMENAL actresses in both talent and beauty was a joy. This piece also served as me connecting with the world that my mother, aunts, and uncles grew up in. They grew up during the time when a new Pam Grier film was THE thing to see. And more than likely they frequented the Ann's Theatre to see such films. As my paintbrush touched the side of that building, I connected with my Wife-Queen's parents and siblings and so many others who literally passed by and frequented Ann's Theatre. The culture surrounding those times. The happenings in North Baton Rouge and on the campus

of my Alma Mater, Southern University. It's ALWAYS a joy to create art of Black women.


3. Why do you think public art is so important for the city of Baton Rouge?

Public Art is so important for Baton Rouge, LA because 1) it's a way to capture and reflect the culture of the city in so many uniquely phenomenal ways by artists who reflect that particular community. 2) We have a HUGE talented artist pool in Baton Rouge and when I see murals all over Baton Rouge by other Walls artists I get so motivated at the beauty they've added to otherwise unappealing spaces.


4. What is your favorite memory about the mural or mural painting process?

My favorite memory about creating the mural was just connecting with the other artists nearby who were painting these phenomenal two-dimensional opuses of beautiful Blackness. I'm just happy and humbled to have been chosen to be involved.


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