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Meet four influential women in photography who left their mark on Futures Fund

Since 2015, Futures Fund has helped thousands of middle and high school students and adults learn how to do photography and code. Over the years, the program has worked with creatives, photographers, artists, professional developers, and web specialists to provide youth and adults with all of the necessary tools to pursue their dreams and ideal careers.


Futures Fund is grateful to have worked with some of the most inspiring, kind, and innovative women in photography during our programming. We want to shed light on some of the women in photography who made Futures Fund the impactful program it is today.


Are you interested in tapping into your talents and learning more about photography or coding? Register for our fall semester now. Your people are waiting for you.



Artist, educator, photographer, founder of The New Church, and bonus mom


Tell me about your involvement with the Futures Fund program...

I was a lead photo instructor from 2016-2019.

What did you take away from the Futures Fund experience?

The program was really involved in listening to the students in a way that I haven't seen so much of in general/public teen education. There were a lot of different teaching techniques that were being used because we worked with Foos.

Tell me about your journey with photography and how it has evolved since working with Futures Fund…

I started the photo program at LSU in 2014. Dropped out my third semester and started doing whatever made sense on the financial end of things (weddings, events, etc). [My work] mostly keeps up with where Black Contemporary is and things I picked up after being in a lot of different fine arts spaces. My teaching style was probably more affected than anything.

I definitely worked with more youth after Futures Fund. That was my first time teaching so I pretty much had no idea what I was doing. But it was me learning how to be a teaching artist I guess. It definitely made me a lot more comfortable in the classroom. I worked as a teaching assistant for NOMA and taught my own class after that. Currently teaching photo and art at McKinley.

What types of photography or creative works do you do now?

Most of my work is about gender, identity, social constructs, capitalism, neo-expressionism, Black diasporic dimensions...I do much of whatever strikes me at the time.

Photo by Dorthy Ray

What advice would you give to anyone who wants to learn more about photography or content creation?

Use what you have, study the masters and have fun with it or you're doing it wrong.


Portrait photographer and Futures Fund photography instructor


Tell me about your involvement with the Futures Fund program…

In 2018, Meg Guidroz introduced me to The Futures Fund photography program, suggesting I may be an instructor. Taylor Hunter interviewed and hired me as a photography instructor. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed working with middle and high school students in person and through Zoom classes since then.

What did you take away from the Futures Fund experience?

Sometimes you just have to help a person unlock their belief that they can create. And give them some basic tools to do so.

Tell me about your journey with photography and how it has evolved since working with Futures Fund…

When I was 12, I started photographing with a Polaroid camera. By the time I was 16, I was using my father's Yashica twin lens reflex camera to take medium format photographs. My photography education began with black and white negatives and prints, as well as slide development and printing. Before long, I brought a camera with me wherever I went, in an effort to capture unique and fleeting moments.

What types of photography or creative works do you do now?

I am a people photographer. I LOVE capturing candid portraits, especially when people are experiencing joy.



Photo by Felicia Leggio Braud

What advice would you give to anyone who wants to learn more about photography or content creation?

Pick up a camera and talk to me. Teens can take classes through Futures Fund. Keep a camera (or phone, nowadays) handy to be able to capture those exceptional moments, especially those that are unposed.

Anything else you want to share?

I wish that 225 still had photo contests.


Photo by Raegan Labat

Creative Director and illustrator


Tell me about your involvement with the Futures Fund program...

I was both a teacher’s assistant and a photography instructor from 2017-2019. I had the opportunity to work with all students levels (middle school and high school/beginner and advanced)

What did you take away from the Futures Fund experience?

My greatest takeaway was how much I enjoyed working with the youth. They are so honest and insightful. Much wiser and observant than the world gives them credit for. Each session was an equal exchange. They taught me just as much as I taught them.


Tell me about your journey with photography and how it has evolved since working with Futures Fund...

I don’t shoot as much as I did prior to the pandemic, but I still have an appreciation for it.

What types of photography or creative works do you do now?

I’m still a full-time graphic designer (as I was while teaching). Most of my current personal work involves stream-of-consciousness writing and illustration. My babies (passion projects) are House of Sassfiend, a statement vintage business, Hoping This Heals You, a public diary and resting place for fleeting and ruminating thoughts on life, and 1-800-FEENIN, a sensual R&B pleasure experience that creates a safe space for New Orleans residents to release their desires. House of Sassfiend and 1-800-FEENIN require the most photography and art direction which is a beautiful challenge.


Photo by Tyronecia Moore

What advice would you give to anyone who wants to learn more about photography or content creation?

You’ll learn best by doing. Create what you like first.

Follow or connect with creatives who inspire you.

Invest in tools that will help with your work.

Experiment and don’t censor yourself.

Anything else you want to share?

There’s no wrong way to create.


Photographer, creative director, and artist


Tell me about your involvement with the Futures Fund program...

I found the Futures Fund at a time in my life when I was really seeking a creative opportunity for myself. I had just graduated from college and gotten a degree in psychology. I knew that my heart wanted to pursue photography. Somehow, I ended up at a meeting with Casey and I found out about this amazing program called the Futures Fund that taught middle school and high schoolers photography and coding for the web and I was asked to join the team as a photography instructor. I saw a lot of myself in those kids back then.

I was a photography instructor for about a year and a half. Then, I joined the team in an administrative assistant role, then later that transitioned to me becoming the program manager of Futures Fund. From there on, I basically helped the program grow to what it is today. Not only myself, but there've also been a ton of incredible people who have been a part of the journey. It definitely poured so much into me to get to where I am now too. I met so many other photographers on the way too who were able to help me, teach me and guide me.

What did you take away from the Futures Fund experience?

Sometimes it takes seeing someone like yourself for you to really believe it's possible for you to achieve something. For those students and having them look up at me and what I was doing really empowered me to go further in my journey. It pushed me to believe in myself a lot more.

Tell me about your journey with photography and how it has evolved since working with Futures Fund…

It was the last corporate/full-time job that I’ve ever worked. I was able to take a leap of faith and pursue photography full-time. It definitely gave me the confidence and a lot of skill sets that I was able to apply to become a photographer.

I’ve worked with brands like Essence, Peloton, JBL Audio, Soho house, Black Girl in Om, and traveled all across the country for photography. And it continues to evolve. When you’re creative, you can pour that energy into multiple outlets. So now, beyond photography, I’m seeking other creative outlets to express myself within. It’s kind of like a gateway to being an artist in all ways.

What types of photography or creative works do you do now?

Right now I’m mostly doing music, events, and nightlife photography. One of my goals would be to shoot more musicians and to create album covers or creative assets for people in music. Music is very important to me.

Photo by Taylor S. Hunter

Finally having my own art show or photo exhibit would be a big goal for me. Because I realized I do have a lot of work from the years so I’m working on curating that in a way that speaks to the world. My mantra is ‘expand your experience.’ I want to put things into the world that gets people to question their beliefs, gets people to expand their perspectives, and shift their mindset on what it means to be a human.

What advice would you give to anyone who wants to learn more about photography or content creation?

The best camera you have is the one that’s in your hand. Your particular perspective is important. No one can tell a story the way you can. Take a lot of pictures. Don't stop. Don't compare yourself to other photographers. All photography is so different. That's the beauty of the gift. You have your own lens. Be open to building community in that space. There's someone who might be able to share their perspective that could help you unlock your own perspective.

Anything else you want to share?

It's really cool to be doing this interview, full circle with Futures Fund. It's such a huge part of my journey so far. It's cool to see how quickly something can grow. I look forward to seeing it continue to expand and give young teens an outlet and show them the possibilities are infinite and they can be anything they want to be. Thank you, Futures Fund.


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